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missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne ridgway was assistant secretary of state for europe and candidate from 1985-89. in her 32 year fo
. europe right now is the safe haven. there's no negative news. by any means, they are not done with all that's going on over there. everything is focused here on the u.s. and the fiscal cliff, and until that is resolved, if it gets resolved, the traders are pulling back, volatility's high, and there's going to be very thin volume in the markets. it's not going to take much to get gold and silver back up. >> well, back to cindy quickly. if we have a deal, is it bullish for oil? she's already gone. i'll ask doreen, you're with us, aren't you? >> i am. volume, today, by the way, 37% below the three month average. could lead to some volatility, but we have not seen that, have we? >> we have not, but vix is up at 19, a little bit higher. the hope is to get more volume here, otherwise, you know, the fiscal cliff is killing everything. everything. these guys don't get it in washington. i don't know why. i hope they come to their senses soon. ashley: nobody knows why, but i'm tired of saying "fiscal cliff," i know that. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> and cindy who ran off. t
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
the region is in for a long. of time of change the central or eastern europe -- long period of time of change than central or eastern europe faced. the main argument is, it is upon us, and more change is coming. some of that will include islamist forces and the need to figure out how to best use our power to shape and influence their transition. >> on to rob. >> a couple of closing points. first, generally we tend to project exceed a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. those of us who are various religious faiths here know the extent to which we practice our faith is and how faithful we are to this or that religious prescription. we know that we fall pretty short, but we think, muslims all pray five times a day, they never touched a scotch. they all do every commandment in islam. and they submit to the will of their local imam, et cetera. it does not work that way. moslem practice in general is not so different than general practice here. muslims want the political the way that we want to be political. let us not fall prey to the bigotry of low expectati
. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furthermore, azerbaijan and joys the solid relationship with israel. which further distances terrain from one anot
europe. and these guys are good. eventually they will develop an icbm that could reach the united states. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though t
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejection
for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his
, and liberation of europe. ike smoked four packs a day as a general, quit cold turkey in 1949. he gave himself an order to quit, he said. he had a heart attack in 1955, and operation in 1956, a small stroke in 1957, doctors worried about the blood pressure and ordering him to worry less. what do they they the job is, he said? he tried to relax playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record, but golf was the wrong game for a perfectionist. he was grim on the course, and once through a chipping wedge at a doctor, howard snyder, when snyder tried to make him feel better about a shot from the bunker. he had a tumper. his mother would quote the bible saying he the conquer their own soul is greater than he who takes a city. ike would say his mother taught him how to control the temper. one of the aids said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter] when he was mad, he was like tearing into a steel furnace said an aide. he had trouble sleeping, and towards the end, took too many sleeping pills and an extra drink of too, worn out in the end, and looked it in 1960. ike, old golf playi
for the united states to open up a second front in western europe, and the british and roosevelt asked stalin to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the brit
and europe. the country boasts more than a 20% share in the global medical capsule market. mitsubishi chemical representatives said the medical capsule business has a potential for stable growth. they added the company will continue to expand in the medical and health sectors. that's the latest in business. here's a recap of market figures. ♪ ♪ >>> japan's liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe will form his new government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his government's visions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country'
. the dollar has been lower. they have talked about the gains that we have been seeing over in europe. the euro top 50. that is very interesting, as well. this is the environment. it bodes very well. another winning day here on wall street. drug stocks, bank stocks doing well. the vix, the fear index, is to the downside. let's take a look at urban outfitters. taking a look at their quarterly sales. they are looking better than expected. under their umbrella is a name brand that a lot of the teenagers know very well. they had a good block friday. urban outfitters is up over two dollars. back to you. connell: as we get close to this fiscal cliff, both sides agreeing to get serious. we have heard the house speaker will update us on the talks within that hour from house floor. we will hear what speaker banner has to say. joining us right now are to congressman. would you vote if there was an agreement? >> i think it will be a balanced plan that will increase revenues by raising the rates on upper income families, but, at the same time, agreeing to substantial cuts. connell: the reason i started by
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in italy, you do have elections coming up. there's a chance getting a higher share than people anticipate. but even then, the financial forces are going to force any government that comes into power to more or less stick to the plan morsi set out. on the other hand, there's always spain, the worries that with 25% unemployment, that you would see the default rate particularly on residential mortgages shoot up, it's 3% now, which is pretty amazing given the struggles within the economy, but we think it will go up somewhat, but really not any more than people have already priced in. >> and then ten year yields, 5.24%. at the moment, relatively speaking, pretty comfortable. >> maybe a little bit too comfortable and we certainly don't want to get complace complacent.yields are where they were say in march of this year and then subsequently they shot
we gone bankrupt last year, europe would have ended. so they sent in monty to manage the situation in order for the german and french banks to get their money back. the ucb printed out -- ecb print out money used to help our banks but do not use it to finance our businesses. they give it to them buy to see buy back their debt to help french and german banks. that was monty's work. and in the meantime, our debt went up. >> reporter: and by the way, the five-star movement is number two in the polls. but he's not really a politician. he is a comedian. not kidding. he actually is a comedian. we also managed to catch up with the politician who's more serious about becoming the next prime minister, who has 30% of the votes in the latest polls, his name is mr. bercani. you know him. we'll show you that in the next hour. now it is time for your "global markets report." >>> all right. thank you very much. we are slightly weighted to the upside here. the european equity grind-up rally continues. advances outpaced decliners about 5-4. the dow jones 600, the ftse flat up three points. the dax
by climate change? >> our economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and t
of the army? >> they are roughly 123,000 total. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a d
, but from europe, from the central bank there, as well as from china, don't forget, so we've had this liquidity which has taken asset prices with the stock market and the bond markets, pricing it way up, it is actually helping housing after a long wait. moving into the future, there will be some duction in relythe fear that people have. it is not only a lack of confidence, but it is a fear of things going wrong. as we get day to day, i think the fed has been the only place in town to inject some optimism or feeling somewhat better in the general public, as well as in business. until we get through this silliness in washington, i think people will continue to be cautious. >> susie: speaking of that caution and fear, what should investors be doing with their money. so many of them, not only individual investors, but professional investors are sitting on a pile of crash. ldof o invest? what is your investment strategy? >> people, the viewers right now, many of them have been out of the stock market for an extended period of time, because of all of the craziness of the last decade. i
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
devastated by annihilation and holocaust in europe. so this book is about israel's political culture. and it's most pointedly a biography of a modern sparta, the story of a military society and a powerful defense establishment, a ruling elite who have found it very difficult over the decades to engage in the processes of peace and who have enter a warrior kind of ethos that overpowers every other institution in national life. the ruling elite in israel is not a large class. there have been only ten prime ministers since david men giewr onif you do the double counting, and so it is possible to introduce them as characters in a group biography, and that is what i've tried to do. we must always remind ourselves in looking at any nation's history that all politics is local. and in israel during the first decade of statehood, the pioneer spirit began to flag when israelis were short of water, short of good agricultural base, and when the bright sheen of ben-gurion's leadership began to fade because young people were will hess and less interested in pursuing military service as a career than they
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
's head now into europe. very patchy around here. this is extremely unstable across much of the continent. when i pull back the clouds, you'll see what i'm talking act. we've got low-pressure systems just dotted around the continue innocent. lots of windy and wet weather toward the west and the north. down here towards the southeast, we've got a low moving in that's going to bring some more severe weather in terms of the thunderstorms, and lots of snow. frigid air is descending from the north, and we'll see a lot of snowfall even quite far south into italy and the northern balkans. i want to show you some video coming out of ukraine. now, this is in kiev, the capital. this is the first snow of the winter. now, last friday's temperatures were the warmest seasonably that they have been for the last hundred years. many people found themselves quite unprepared for the sudden change in the weather. commuters in the region found themselves inconvenienced as the snow led to a lot of congestion on the roads in the downtown area. road crews were scrambling out, trying to get the mess cleaned up, p
revealed in the reaction of the markets here in america and in europe. people know the recession could follow if they do not do a deal, and that is why he is trying to get one. >> thank you very much for joining us. there is still no deal yet, but as the economic crisis has shown, 2012 will not be known as the year of political unity in washington. it may come as a surprise, but some of the nation's leaders have been immortalized in a work of art. "the network" is a video installation done by an artist. i went to the national portrait gallery where it is on display. >> 4, 3, 2, 1. [applause] >> washington's elite gathering for the first glimpse of themselves in a video portrait that enshrines them in art and history. >> lo and behold, we get this gift. and 89 americans were chosen by the artist to represent contemporary leadership. some are less recognizable than others, but all our leaders in their field. the results -- a constantly changing snapshot of power. >> within the realm of contemporary arts, it needs to be at the table for conversations about politics and policy. what i am r
the rest of europe, not against austerity cutbacks. the demonstrators accused the authorities of going on a spending spree which they claim wastes too much of the country's financial resources. instead of doubling their usual christmas or new year's shopping, these people decided to take to the streets and protests against the government and the wrongful spending of their money, the people's money. opposition leaders are asking for early elections from thousands of their followers. but >> this is only the beginning. they use police forces to send us from parliament. now we are on the streets and fighting for democracy in our country on the streets. >> we are here because we are against this regime and we want democracy to return to macedonia. we want to remove this dictator. resistance is our duty. >> we have gathered to say enough of this and the parliament representatives. >> demonstrations finished peacefully, but resolving this and the former yugoslav republic of macedonia is still far away. >>> russia says that its forces have killed seven suspected militants in the troubled cauca
a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. con
from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not because of a lack evidence but because it would put the future of the largest banks at risk. think of that. not because they didn't have the goods. they were worried about the banking system. this says clearly it
are iran and eastern europe. in iran jimmy carter helped topple the shah of iran and then stood back and did not help the new rebel government to set it sell up as self governing group and the ayatollah came in and shoved aside the well meaning democrats and set up an islamist state. look at fall of the reagan wall, when that happened we sent in people to help. we sent in bookkeepers and political experts to show them how to run the political parties and say this is how free media works but just gave them the tools. so iran, the greatest threat to world peace today. and, eastern europe, america's greatest ally. >>neil: very interesting. thank you very much. i almost forgot k.t. was speaking, the world is going to end tomorrow. did nut worry. that is when the mayans say we should be ready to say goodbye. hold off on that mortgage payment. second, take a look at what a lot of survivallives are spending their money on instead. >> they have always predicted the end of the world. >> i have a good feeling about this, sweetheart. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that a
. they could start making the point europe and japan has been doing this a couple of years now, massively raising taxes. japan is now in official recession. southern europe is contracting. france and germany about to go into recession. what can't you guys learn? higher taxes don't work. melissa: yeah. but seems lying the public at large has not bought that argument. mitt romney tried to make that argument. a lot of people tried to make the argument. it hasn't worked. >> you emphasize what is the best way to get the economy moving again. means to end. instead of fighting on democrat's ground, establish your own ground. taxes does notn growth. greater spending does not mean growth. mammoth regulations taking away control from patients does not lead to growth. fight on your own turf instead of democrats. melissa: you're a master of negotiation. you know so much about this. how would you reset the negotiations? >> toss out a few grenades. passing in the house entitlement reforms can't take any benefits from existing beneficiaries. love to see the senate reject that one. how about another bill
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a further step. again if it happens, it could be another step in building pressure on china to enforce the u.n. security council sanctions on north korea and in fact to team up with the rest of the world to try to apply stronger sanctions and more effective sanctions on north korea. jon: kim jong-un and his father indicated, they proved time and time again they were more interested in having ballistic missiles and that kind of technology than they were in seeing their people fed. are you convinced that there is a way to impose
hear about the army firing one of our most effective division commanders in europe in our first your of war there, and that's really the they had that began the book for me, going back and studying this. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult rel
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
in missiles, -- winding machine. these things are used in missiles. europe has tightened up. they have been working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation pr
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
. investors waiting to see what comes out of the fiscal cliff negotiations and in europe, a choppy start to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or wha
reach israel today and that will be able to reach europe in the not-too-distant future and ultimately the united states. second, you would have, i think, a nuclear tarmd iran would ignite a nuclear arms race in the most volatile part of the world, and third, you -- i think a nuclear armed iran would be significantly more aggressive in placing like iraq and afghanistan and throughout the region in terms of trying to throw their weight around. so i think that this is one of those situations where the only acceptable alternative, the only good alternative is that the economic pressures bring enough popular unhappiness in iran because of economic disasters that are going on there, that the regime decides it is in its own best interests and for its own security. >> rose: that assumes rational thinking on their part. >> i think that they are not irrational. and, you know, to say that they are rational actors all the time, i don't accept that either, but when it comes to these kind of things, the one thing they don't want is a war with the united states. and so i think that this -- the only
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